Daydream Nation now on the National Recording Registry

Sonic YouthThis is excellent, one of my favorite bands, Sonic Youth, has been honored by the Library of Congress with the inclusion of their masterwork, Daydream Nation on the National Recording Registry, where the entry reads, ”Daydream Nation. Sonic Youth. (1988) _Pioneer members of New York City’s clangorous early 1980s No Wave scene, Sonic Youth are renowned for a glorious form of noise-based chaos. Guitarists Thurston Moore and Lee Ranaldo had previously performed with Glenn Branca’s large guitar ensembles, and their alternative guitar tunings and ringing harmonies attest to this apprenticeship. On Daydream Nation, their third album, the group’s forays into outright noise always return to melodic songs that employ hypnotic arpeggios, driving punk rock rhythmic figures and furious gales of guitar-based noise. Bassist Kim Gordon’s haunting vocals and edgy lyrics add additional depth to the numbers she sings_.” The overview of the album on Wikipedia says, ”_But it was the double LP Daydream Nation (1988) that earned SY unanimous crossover critical acclaim and a new record deal with a major label, Geffen Records. On Daydream Nation, they had perfected their style, becoming virtuosic sculptors of guitar noise that could unfold with nearly symphonic grandeur.[](http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/68/Sonic_Youth_live_20050707.jpg/800px-Sonic_Youth_live_20050707.jpg)The album became an instant indie classic; it included some of the band’s best-known songs, such as “Teenage Riot,” “Candle” and “The Sprawl,” inspired by the works of writer William Gibson. A number of prominent music periodicals, including Rolling Stone and Spin Magazine, hailed Daydream Nation as one of the best albums of the decade_.” Let’s not forget Pitchfork ranking it number 1 of 100 in their Top 100 Albums of the 1980s either. Needless to say, it’s a classic (now historic!) album, has long been on my top 10 albums of all time (desert island picks), so it’s so very cool that it’s now in the Library of Congress.

 
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